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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of Greek Orthodox Waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman period period found in the catalog.

Greek Orthodox Waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman period period

Souad Slim

Greek Orthodox Waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman period period

by Souad Slim

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  • 28 Currently reading

Published by University of Birmingham in Birmingham .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D) - University of Birmingham, School of Historical Studies, Centre for the Study of Islam and Christian-Muslim relations.

Statementby Souad Slim.
The Physical Object
Pagination269 p. :
Number of Pages269
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20250408M

The Antiochian Greeks (Rum) living in Hatay are the descendants of the Ottoman Levant's and southeast Anatolia's Greek population and are part of the Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch. They did not emigrate to Greece during the population exchange because at that time the Hatay province was under French control. Witnesses for Christ: Orthodox Christian Neomartyrs of the Ottoman Period St Vladimir's Seminary Press, pp. ISBN ; Fr. Samir Khalil Samir (S.J.), Giorgio Paolucci, and Camille Eid. Questions on Islam: Samir Khalil Samir on Islam and the West. Transl. by Wafik Nasry and Claudia Castellani.

During the late Ottoman period (–), a time of contestation about imperial policy toward minority groups, music helped the Ottoman Greeks in Istanbul define themselves as .   During the 17th and 18th centuries, however, thousands of Greeks were forced to convert to Islam, among them , Pontian Greeks. Thousands of Greek fled to Christian Russia to escape Turkish persecution, particularly following the numerous Russian-Turkish wars in .

-Exploiting its religious ties with Greek Orthodox subjects of the Ottoman Empire to gain influence in internal affairs-Allying itself on the basics of common religious and Slavic bonds with Balkan independence movements to become the Great Power patron of potential new states-Direct warfare against the armies of the Ottoman Empire. Elizabeth Dodge Huntington, who was a member of the board of Robert College and theAmerican Hospital, wrote in Istanbul on “Social Organizations,” three years before the end of the Ottoman Empire, saying of the Greek Orthodox churches the following: “The churches are mostly made of stone or brick [covered with] plaster.


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Greek Orthodox Waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman period period by Souad Slim Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Slim, Souad Abou el-Rousse, Greek Orthodox Waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman period. Würzburg: Ergon Verlag,   The Greek Orthodox Waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman Period (Beiruter Texte Und Studien) [Abou el-Rousse Slim, Souad] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

The Greek Orthodox Waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman Period (Beiruter Texte Und Studien)Cited by: 6. Ergon-Verlag. View at Menadoc. In her dissertation thesis Souad Abou el-Rousse Slim focuses on the study and historical analysis of the waqf institutions (widely known as Islamic religious institutions and family establishments) of the Greek Orthodox community during the Ottoman period, which has been the most favored Christian community in the empire.

Lebanese Greek Orthodox Christians (Arabic: المسيحية الأرثوذكسية الرومية في لبنان) refers to Lebanese people who are adherents of the Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch in Lebanon, which is an autocephalous Greek Orthodox Church within the wider communion of Eastern Orthodox Christianity, and is the second largest Christian denomination in Lebanon after the.

The Greek orthodox waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman period. Posted on Tuesday January 3rd, by Daniel Brenn. Volume of the Beiruter Texte und Studien ‘The Greek orthodox waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman period‘ by Souad Abou el. The Greek orthodox waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman period Volume of the Beiruter Texte und Studien ‘ The Greek orthodox waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman period ‘ by Souad Abou el-Rousse Slim is now available Open Access on MENAdoc.

Resistance to Ottoman rule. During much of the four centuries of the “ Tourkokratia,” as the period of Ottoman rule in Greece is known, there was little hope that the Greeks would be able to free themselves by their own efforts. There were sporadic revolts, such as those that occurred on the mainland and on the islands of the Aegean following the defeat of the Ottoman navy in by Don.

Monastery of St. Elias Shwayya (The Patriarchal Monastery of Mar Elias in Shwayya, or Deir Mar Elias) (Arabic: دير مار إلياس شويّا البطريركيّ ‎) is a stauropegic monastery of the Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch, perched atop a sandstone cliff in the Matn District, thirty-one kilometers from Beirut.

Standing at an altitude of meters, it overlooks the resort. But the French only spent two decades in Lebanon, replacing the Ottomans after the great war, a period during which it was a “mandate”, something like a.

Background. The seat of the patriarchate was formerly Antioch, in what is now r, in the 14th century, it was moved to Damascus, modern-day Syria, following the Ottoman invasion of Antioch.

Its traditional territory includes Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Kuwait, Arab countries of the Persian Gulf and also parts of territory formerly included the Church of Cyprus until the latter. Most of the areas which today are within modern Greece's borders were at some point in the past a part of the Ottoman period of Ottoman rule in Greece, lasting from the midth century until the successful Greek War of Independence that broke out in and the proclamation of the First Hellenic Republic in (preceded by the creation of the autonomous Septinsular Republic in.

Further reading. The Greek Orthodox waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman period, Volume of Beiruter Texte und Souad Abou el-Rousse Slim. Published by Ergon Verlag, ISBN /ISBN ; The Royal Archives of Egypt and the disturbances in Palestine, Issue 11 of Oriental series, American University of Beirut Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

Information about the history of Greece during Ottoman occupation and war of independence. The Ottomans Occupation. After it fell to the Ottomans, Constantinople was renamed Ottoman state was a theocracy and its political system was based on a hierarchy with the Sultan at the top, having absolute divine rights.

Ottoman conquest and early rule. The Ottoman sultan, Selim I (–20), after defeating the Safavids, conquered the Mamluks of troops, invading Syria, destroyed Mamluk resistance in at the Battle of Marj Dabiq, north of Aleppo.

During the conflict between the Mamluks and the Ottomans, the amirs of Mount Lebanon linked their fate to that of Ghazali, governor of Damascus. specializes in selling Arabic Books, new and old, published all over the Arab World, with worldwide delivery. We also offer a large selection of Foreign Language Books, Islamic Books, Hadith Books, and Children's Arabic Books at great prices.

The Greek Orthodox Waqf in Lebanon during the Ottoman Period. Beirut: Orient Institute, The War of Famine: Everyday Life in Wartime Beirut and Mount Lebanon ().'. During the dark years of the Ottoman rule, the Greek Orthodox Church helped the enslaved Greeks to retain their cultural characteristics: the Greek language, the Orthodox Faith and generally the Hellenic ethnic identity.

In a treaty was. "This book is a welcome addition to the field of Greek-Ottoman studies in the nineteenth century because it offers a sustained analysis of the much neglected theme of 'Greek-Orthodox' music in the troubled and complicated late Ottoman period." (Historein) "Highly recommended for academic libraries." (Music Reference Services Quarterly)Author: Merih Erol.

Hagia Sophia (/ ˈ h ɑː ɡ i ə s oʊ ˈ f iː ə /; from the Greek 'Αγία Σοφία, pronounced [aˈʝia soˈfia], "Holy Wisdom"; Latin: Sancta Sophia or Sancta Sapientia; Turkish: Ayasofya) is the former Greek Orthodox Christian patriarchal cathedral, later an Ottoman imperial mosque and now a museum (Ayasofya Müzesi) in Istanbul, is famous for its large dome.

In either case, then, it seems that the monastery of St Elias, like most Orthodox monasteries, was re-founded during the Ottoman period after a long period of abandonment. S t Elias Shwayya suffered from the schism of The monastery was granted to Greek Catholics and Greek Orthodox, depending on which community paid more revenues to the.

Greek Orthodox Music in Ottoman Istanbul Book Description: During the late Ottoman period (), a time of contestation about imperial policy toward minority groups, music helped the Ottoman Greeks in Istanbul define themselves as a distinct cultural group.In ADthe city of Constantinople, the capital and last stronghold of the Byzantine Empire, fell to the Ottoman this time Egypt had been under Muslim control for some seven centuries.

Jerusalem had been conquered by the Umayyad Muslims inwon back by Rome in under the First Crusade and then reconquered by Saladin's forces during the Siege of Jerusalem in During the early s, the two sides made demands which the Sultan could not possibly satisfy simultaneously.

Inthe Sultan adjudicated in favour of the French, despite the vehement protestations of the local Orthodox monks. The ruling Ottoman siding with Rome over the Orthodox provoked outright war (see the Eastern Question).